348
Serum IgE Levels in Obese and Non-Obese Asthmatics
Sunday, March 6, 2016
South Exhibit Hall H (Convention Center)
Maria Paula Henao, Faoud T. Ishmael, MD PhD FAAAAI, Efren L. Rael, MD FAAAAI
Rationale:

Obese asthmatics have increased risks for poor control and worse outcomes, and may be associated with a less atopic phenotype. We sought to determine the prevalence of obesity in our asthma clinic and determine whether this was connected to total serum IgE level.

Methods:

After informed consent and IRB approval, 114 subjects were recruited from our asthma clinic from 2011-2015. Participants were stratified by BMI, initially separating the cohort into non-obese (BMI less than 30; n=66) and obese asthmatics (n=48). Subsequently, cohorts were divided into four groups: BMI <25; 25-30; 30-40; >40. T-tests and ANOVAs were use to assess differences between total serum IgE levels among these groups. Additionally, we ran similar tests when stratifying the cohort by sex and FEV1% levels.

Results:

Obesity was highly prevalent in our asthma clinic (42% of subjects). The entire cohort had a mean total serum IgE of 569.8 (kU/L) ± 2197.3 (median: 93.9; range 0.5-22,283). Total IgE was 774.9±852.7 in non-obese asthmatics vs 287.8±460.7 in obese subjects, which did not reach statistical significance (p=0.24). Dividing the cohort into four groups across BMI values, a one-way ANOVA did not reveal any significant variance (p=0.51 unadjusted; p=0.65 adjusted for sex). When isolating groups 1 and 4, no significant variance was found (p=0.42). We also performed these tests within the interquartile range of serum IgE values and found similar results. 

Conclusions:

Our study showed no correlation between total serum IgE levels and BMI in asthmatics regardless of severity of illness. Further studies with other markers of atopy are needed.