850:
Implications of population admixing and ancestry on allergic disease
Monday, March 5, 2018
South Hall A2 (Convention Center)
Chan Ok Shin, Hwan Soo Kim, Yoon Hong Chun, Jong Seo Yoon, Hyun Hee Kim, Jin-Tack Kim, MD PhD
RATIONALE:

Differences exist among racial and ethnic groups in the prevalence and severity of allergic diseases. However, influence of population admixing on allergic disease has not been studied. We examined the effect of population admixing on the occurrence of allergic disease.

METHODS:

We reviewed the data of 75,643 adolescents who participated in the 11th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which provides a sample that is representative of the entire Korean middle school and high school student population. Multi-ethnic status was determined by using parental country of birth and prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), and atopic dermatitis (AD) was determined by questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Multi-ethnic adolescents accounted for approximately 1.2% of the total sample of adolescents. Prevalence of asthma was significantly higher in multi-ethnic group than non multi-ethnic group while AR and AD was significantly higher in non multi-ethnic group than multi-ethnic group. Parental region of country at birth had a significant influence on the prevalence of allergic disease. After adjusting for various variables, residential area, perceived economic status, parental region of country at birth, and BMI had a significant effect on prevalence of asthma. Residential area, perceived economic status had significant effect on prevalence of AR. Residential area, parental region of country at birth, and BMI had a significant influence on prevalence of AD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Population admixing appears to have significant effect on the prevalence of allergic disease. Further study will be needed to clarify the effect of population admixing on prevalence of allergic disease.