173:
Distinguishing Features of Patients with Comorbid Urticaria and Angioedema Versus Isolated Urticaria and Angioedema
Saturday, March 3, 2018
South Hall A2 (Convention Center)
Jennifer E. Boeckman, DO, Shari V. Montandon, DO, Andrej Petrov, MD, Merritt L. Fajt, MD FAAAAI
RATIONALE: Patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria and angioedema have high healthcare utilization. Chronic urticaria is often associated with angioedema; however, little is known about the differences between patients with comorbid urticaria and angioedema (CUA) versus isolated urticaria (IU) and isolated angioedema (IA). We hypothesize there are distinguishing clinical features between patients with CUA versus IU and IA.

METHODS: We retrospectively categorized chronic idiopathic urticaria and angioedema patients seen in a university allergy immunology clinic from September 2007-2017 as CUA, IU or IA and analyzed demographic and clinical features.

RESULTS: We reviewed 301 patients: 154 were CUA, 94 were IU, and 53 were IA. Patients with IA were significantly older than patients with CUA and IU (p=0.0009). Patients with CUA had a higher BMI than either patients with IA or IU (p=0.0207). There were no differences in gender or race. Patients with CUA had a higher frequency of positive anti-FCeRI antibody than patients with IA or IU (p=0.0434). Patients with CUA were more likely than IU, but less likely than IA, to present to the emergency room for their symptoms (p=0.0001). Patients with CUA compared to IU or IA patients were more likely to have been prescribed systemic steroids (p=0.0002), H2 blockers (p=0.0119), and omalizumab (p=0.0046) for treatment of their condition.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests significant differences between patient demographics, healthcare utilization, and treatment between patients with CUA versus IU and IA and may impact the care of these patients.