361:
Serum periostin levels during follow-up and management of asthma in children treated with inhaled corticosteroids
Sunday, March 4, 2018
South Hall A2 (Convention Center)
Heysung Baek, MD, Yeong-Gwan Im, Sun Hee Choi, MD, Man Yong Han, Kenji Izuhara, MD PhD
RATIONALE: The significance of periostin as a biomarker of TH2-induced airway inflammation, and as a measure of the response to TH2-targeted therapy, has recently been emphasized. The aim of this prospective study was to measure serum periostin levels during follow-up and management of asthma in children treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS).

METHODS: Thirty-six asthmatic children aged 6 to 18 years previously treated (or not) with ICS were included. Following the guidelines of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA), all patients underwent standard inhaled corticosteroid treatment for 12 months, based on disease severity. Serum periostin levels and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels were measured at baseline and post-intervention, and spirometry and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) were performed.

RESULTS: Significant improvements in ACT data compared with baseline values were observed during follow-up (P=0.02). Serum periostin levels increased in 33 of 36 asthmatic subjects at 1-year follow-up. Changes in serum periostin levels did not significantly correlate with changes in ACT results or pulmonary function. ACT data were accompanied by significant reductions in FeNO levels (decrease of 0.427% for each doubling of ACT change from baseline, P = 0.035).

CONCLUSIONS: Serum periostin levels increased significantly during ICS treatment, indicating that serial measurements of such levels may not adequately reflect good asthma management in children.