L21:
Asian Migrants Have a Different Profile of Allergy and Anaphylaxis Than Australian-Born Children: A State-Wide Survey
Monday, March 5, 2018
South Hall A2 (Convention Center)
Yichao Wang, Katrina Jane Allen, MBBS BMedSc PhD FRACP, Jennifer Koplin, PhD, Noor H.A. Suaini
Rationale:

Children of Asian background who are born in Australia have higher rates of eczema and nut allergy than non-Asian children. However, less is known about other allergy and anaphylaxis in this group.

Methods:

We used data from the 2010 School Entrant Health Questionnaire, which was completed for 57,005 students (85.8% response rate) at age 5 in Victoria, Australia. Analyses were conducted using logistic regression with results presented as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results:

Asian children born in Australia were more likely to have food allergy (OR 2.33, 95%CI 1.96-2.77) and eczema (OR 2.04, 95%CI 1.74-2.41), but less likely to have asthma (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.74-1.02) compared to non-Asian children. By contrast, children born in Asia had a lower risk of food allergy (OR 0.33, 95%CI 0.20-0.55), eczema (OR 0.41, 95%CI 0.28-0.62) and asthma (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.21-0.40).

Triggers of anaphylaxis differed by ethnicity and country of birth. Asian children born in Australia had a higher risk of food-induced anaphylaxis (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16-1.94), including anaphylaxis to peanut, tree nuts, soy, wheat and seafood (fish/shellfish), and non-food anaphylaxis (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.75-3.57) compared to non-Asian children.

Interestingly, children born in Asia had a lower risk of food-induced anaphylaxis overall (OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.14-0.56) including anaphylaxis to milk, peanut and tree nuts, but higher risk of anaphylaxis to soy, wheat and non-food anaphylaxis (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.41-3.69).

Conclusions:

Patterns of allergy & anaphylaxis and its triggers differed according to both ethnicity and country of birth.